Kong Ran Qi Gong Practice

Article Index
Kong Ran Qi Gong Practice
Visualizations
Relaxation Sequence
Hand Postures
Closing
All Pages

Given to us by Professor Teng

The purpose of Kongran Qigong is to balance and harmonize ones internal and external Qi, promoting ones over all mental, physical and spiritual well-being.

Opening:

  1. Stand with your feet together, heals touching, toes apart at forty-five degrees from the center, your body upright, your arms relaxed by your sides and the top of your head elevated as if being pulled up by a string. 
    • Relax  in this stance for a moment, let your mind clam and your breath be natural.
    • Step to the left with your left foot in aline with the outside of your left shoulder.
    • Relax again.
    • Step to the right with your right foot in aline with the outside of your right shoulder.
    • Relax again, letting your mind calm and your breath be natural.
  2. Stand in the first Posture as described below.
  3. Then start the visualizations.
  4. Then go through the relaxation sequence while holding the opening posture.
  5. Then start the hand postures as described with pictures below. Hold each posture for a couple of minutes until you feel relaxed. ( click on the postures to see pictures of them )
  6. Then Close

Note: You can do just the opening posture and close if you want, especially in the beginning when you're not used to holding the postures for a long time and then gradually add each posture one at a time as you get more comfortable holding them for longer time. You can also choose to only practice the postures you need depending on what is best for you.


 


Visualizations:

Imagine your standing on top of a mountain, looking over the horizon, feeling healthy and confident, you feel the Earth below and the Heavens above, you are the connection between them both, hold this feeling for a minute. Continue to breath regularly.

Open the Bahui point located at the top of your head. Just open, nothing else.

Relax and open the Yongquan Points (K1) Located at the bottoms of your feet.

Relax and hold yin Qi from nature, think of the moon and water for a moment.

Relax and hold yang Qi from nature, think of the sun and the mountains for a moment.

Relax and hold both yin and yang for a moment. Still breathing regularly, feeling relaxed.

Relax and inhale the nature of the universe, through Bahui.


Relaxation Sequence:

As you go to each part of the body, pause for a moment and feel the tension melt away and really relax as you continue to breath naturally, then move on to the next part of the body and do the same until your whole body feels very relaxed.

Continue breathing in clean Qi from the Bahui point on your head and exhaling waste Qi from the Yongquan points on your feet while you relax your body in the following succession very slowly.

Note: You can repeat the relaxation sequence as many time as you need and can go through it at any time during the practice.

  1. head
  2. neck
  3. shoulders
  4. upper arms
  5. elbows
  6. forearms
  7. hands
  8. upper back and chest
  9. lower back, abdomen and pelvis
  10. upper legs
  11. knees and back of the knees
  12. lower legs
  13. feet
  14. Feel the whole body is relaxed

Hand postures

While you practice, the leg stance and body position remain the same while the  hands and arms change from posture to posture.

Posture one is the opening posture, it helps you connect with pre-heaven Qi.

Postures two through eight reinforce yin Qi. In these postures the palms face the body.

Postures nine through fifteen reinforce yang Qi. In these postures the back of the hands face the body.

Note: Yang postures should be held for shorter durations of time, because Yang Qi builds quicker than Yin. It take much more time to build Yin Qi than it does Yang. Over practicing Yang postures could lead to Yang excess, so in the beginning practice them sparingly until you develop a good sense of internal balance. Signs of Yang excess are difficulty sleeping, irritability and sensitivity to heat, if you experience any of these signs during or after your practice stop practicing until you fell calm and/or like your normal self again. Then restart the practice by only practicing the Yin postures. Never practice when angry or in a bad mood. Feel free to contact us any time with questions, we are always happy to help in any way that we can.

Posture one helps you connect with pre-heaven Qi.

Postures two, three, four, nine, ten and eleven help calm the liver and reinforce the kidneys.

Postures five and twelve reinforce the essence of the spleen and calm stomach Qi.

Postures six and thirteen open the heart and reinforce lung Qi.

Postures seven and fourteen open the shoulders, neck, heart and lungs and also help your Qi to sink.

Postures eight and fifteen are very powerful in helping your Qi to sink, promoting your over all health.

Posture One:

Hands by your sides. Back of your hands facing front-ward, thumbs in toward your body, shoulders relaxed, there should be a space between your arms and body. Your hands are relaxed but not curled, straight but not over extended. Your knees slightly bent. Your pelvis slightly tucked and you should feel that you're leaning forward ever so slightly. Tuck your chin and extend your body upward as if being pulled by a string from the top of your head.

Posture Two:

Hands are behind your body, palms directed at the Baihai yu (BL 30) points at the lower part of the buttocks. Your hands should be about four to six inches away from your buttocks. In this posture you should feel a stretch in your chest and shoulders.

Posture Three:

Hands in-front of the body at groin level, about five inches from your body, palms turned upward and directed at the lower dantian as shown it the picture. Imagine your holding 2 balloons on top water.

Posture Four:

Hands behind the body, palms are directed at the Shenshu (BL 52) points a little below the ribs. Hands should be about five or six inches from your body. In this posture you should really feel a stretch in the chest and shoulders and your shoulders might get tired in the beginning.

Posture Five:

The palms are directed at the Solar Plexus, between the lower Dantian and the middle Dantian, about fifteen inches from your body.

Posture Six:

The palms are directed between the upper Dantian and the middle Dantian and arms are out as if you were hugging someone.

Posture Seven:

The palms are directed between third-eye and Baihui. Keep your arms out as in the last posture, but raise them to the new position as show in the picture.

Posture Eight:

The palms are directed to the Baihui point, again the arms are simply raised to the new position as show in the picture.

After the eighth posture you go back down through all the postures in reverse sequence, holding each posture a few minutes again.

Note: the following seven postures are the Yang postures and are the same as postures two through eight except they're with the palms facing away from the body.

Posture Nine:

Hands are behind your body, back of the hands directed at the Baihai yu (BL 30) points at the lower part of the buttocks. Your hands should be about four to six inches away from your buttocks. In this posture you should feel a stretch in your chest and shoulders.

Posture Ten:

Hands in-front of the body at groin level, about five inches from your body, palms turned outward with the back of the hands directed at the lower dantian as shown it the picture.

Posture Eleven:

Hands behind the body, back of the hands are directed at the Shenshu (BL 52) points a little below the ribs. Hands should be about five or six inches from your body. In this posture you should really feel a stretch in the chest and shoulders and your shoulders might get tired in the beginning.

Posture Twelve:

The palms are directed at the Solar Plexus, between the lower Dantian and the middle Dantian, about fifteen inches from your body.

Posture Thirteen:

The back of the hands are directed between the upper Dantian and the middle Dantian and arms are out as if you were hugging someone.

Posture Fourteen:

The back of the hands are directed between third-eye and Baihui. Keep your arms out as in the last posture, but raise them to the new position as show in the picture.

Posture Fifteen:

The back of the hands are directed to the Baihui point, again the arms are simply raised to the new position as show in the picture.

After the eighth posture you go back down through all the postures in reverse sequence, holding each posture a few minutes again. Hold the opening posture for a few minutes and then begin closing.


Closing:

Inhale gently then hold your breath as you move your left foot back to its original opening position, centered with the toes forty-five degrees from the center.

Relax and exhale

Inhale genteelly again and repeat with your right foot.

With your feet together inhale and hold your breath for a few seconds

Relax and exhale

Slowly open your eyes

Notes:

Never practice when you are angry or experiencing any intense emotions. Always be in a good mood when practicing.

People who are too Yang in nature should avoid practicing the Yang postures and should focus on practicing the Yin postures to strengthen yin energy.

People who are too Yin in nature (closed up in their own spirit) should practice both the Yin and Yang posture practicing the Yang longer while being careful not to build too much Yang energy too quickly. If Yang energy builds too quickly, our system will not be able to assimilate it and health problems will occur. If you start having difficulty sleeping and/or are feeling more aggressive than normal, you should stop practicing completely until you sleep better and feel calm again. Then restart the practice, by just doing the Yin postures and contact us and we will help you to develop a practice plan that works best for you.

Where we practice is very important, try to find places where Qi flows smoothly, where the air is pure and where you feel at peace.

During the practice, we open all our channels to let Qi from nature enter the body, so the environment we practice in needs to be carefully chosen to achieve the best results.

Qi must flow in order to be pure. Look for a good place, not too close to stagnate water or in a valley with too much mist, pollution or noise.

Wear natural clothing and shoes with soles which Qi can travel through freely (leather or cotton are good). This practice is most effective if taught personally by Professor Teng or a qualified teacher. A teacher will transfer an energetic code to your system, which will help guide your Qi when practicing and deliver much greater results.